The Human Truth Foundation

What is the Best Country in the World? An Index of Morality, Conscience and Good Life

By Vexen Crabtree 2017

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#politics

--- The Best ---
Points1
1Iceland84.1
2Sweden80.8
3Norway80.0
4Denmark79.4
5Belgium79.3
6Finland78.4
7Germany77.8
8Switzerland77.7
9Luxembourg77.7
10New Zealand77.4
q=198.
--- The Worst ---
Points1
198Marshall Islands30.2
197Chad32.4
196Yemen32.8
195Somalia33.1
194Congo, DR33.8
193Central African Rep.35.0
192Sudan35.2
191Equatorial Guinea35.2
190Niger35.9
189Angola38.0
q=198.

Which countries set the best examples to the rest of the world? Which ones would we do best to copy, to emulate and to admire for their foresight, hard work and long-term conscience? Which countries would have humanity survive gleaming into a clean, happy, bright future?

And who are tardy on humanitarian issues, science or development? Which nations and cultures cling to barbarian ethics on gender and sexual equality? Who is holding us back?

The Social and Moral Development Index is a compilation of relevant statistics on a wide range of issues which are put into a database-driven formula which calculates points per country. The country's overall score is an average of all the datasets that a country appears in. So, countries don't get penalized for lack of data about them. The result is a shortlist of countries that beat all the others. Be the best!


1. The Criteria (Year) Winners

UN HDI (2016)
Lower is better

Rank2
Social & Moral
Higher is better

Points1
21France2172.2
22Belgium2279.3
23Finland2378.4
24Austria2475.3
25Slovenia2566.9
26Italy2668.7
27Spain2771.0
28Czech Rep.2868.4
29Greece2960.6
30Brunei3062.9
31Estonia3070.7
32Andorra3260.0
33Malta3364.5
34Qatar3356.0
35Cyprus3362.1
36Poland3663.0
37Lithuania3762.9
38Chile3864.0
39Saudi Arabia3846.2
40Slovakia4062.7
q=188.
UN HDI (2016)
Lower is better

Rank2
1Norway1
2Australia2
3Switzerland2
4Germany4
5Denmark5
6Singapore5
7Netherlands7
8Ireland8
9Iceland9
10Canada10
11USA10
12Hong Kong12
13New Zealand13
14Sweden14
15Liechtenstein15
16UK16
17Japan17
18Korea, S.18
19Israel19
20Luxembourg20
q=188.

1.1. Human Development (UN) (informational) (2015) Norway, Australia, Switzerland

#canada #iceland #norway

The United Nations produces an annual Human Development Report which includes the Human Development Index. The factors taken into account include life expectancy, education and schooling and Gross National Income (GNI) amongst many others.

Norway has been the top of this list since ousting Canada in 2001 (except in 2007 and 2008 when Iceland made it to the top).

This data series is only here for informational reasons, meaning, it does not form part of the Social and Moral Development Index formula. This is because the UN HDI takes into account many factors (such as wealth) that are not social or moral in nature.

Links:

1.2. Overall Life Satisfaction (informational) (2011) Denmark, Netherlands, Norway

Life Satisfaction (2011)
Higher is better
3
1Denmark7.8
2Norway7.6
3Netherlands7.6
4Venezuela7.5
5Sweden7.5
6Switzerland7.5
7Austria7.5
8Canada7.4
9Australia7.4
10Israel7.4
q=150.
Life Satisfaction (2011)
Higher is better
3
150Togo2.8
149Botswana3.6
148Central African Rep.3.6
147Benin3.7
146Chad3.7
145Yemen3.7
144Senegal3.8
143Burundi3.8
142Haiti3.8
141Mali3.8
q=150.

Studying happiness is difficult and people tend to overstate their own happiness - in particular those who are aware of international studies of happiness and want to portray their country in a good light. It is also especially overstated by religious folk who are institutionalized into repeating the story of 'how happy my religion makes me'4.

It is of course true that the happiest people are not those who are necessarily leading the best lives. Excess, indulgence and short-term policy can all lead to a high rating on this chart; things like living morally and frugally, for example, do not automatically go hand in hand with happiness. For this reason, this data is being shown on this page just for general interest and does not form part of the scoring for each country.

Despite the above disclaimer, it turns out to be true that those nations that score high on the moral and long-term issues on this page are also those who tend to be happiest.

Links:

1.3. Environmental Performance (2011) Iceland, Switzerland, Costa Rica

#bhutan #equatorial_guinea #haiti #iceland #switzerland #turkmenistan #united_arab_emirates

Environmental Performance (2010)
Higher is better
5
1Iceland93.5
2Switzerland89.1
3Costa Rica86.4
4Sweden86.0
5Norway81.1
6Mauritius80.6
7France78.2
8Austria78.1
9Cuba78.1
10Colombia76.8
11Malta76.3
12Finland74.7
13Slovakia74.5
14UK74.2
15New Zealand73.4
16Chile73.3
17Germany73.2
18Italy73.1
19Portugal73.0
20Japan72.5
q=162.
Environmental Performance (2010)
Higher is better
5
162Sierra Leone32.1
161Central African Rep.33.3
160Mauritania33.7
159Angola36.3
158Togo36.4
157Niger37.6
156Turkmenistan38.4
155Mali39.4
154Haiti39.5
153Benin39.6
152Nigeria40.2
151UAE40.7
150Chad40.8
149Iraq41.0
148Botswana41.3
147Cambodia41.7
146Korea, N.41.8
145Equatorial Guinea41.9
144Bahrain42.0
143Senegal42.3
q=162.

The United Nation's Environmental performance index includes 25 indicators including air pollution, (de)forestation, natural resources use, etc. Various data sets are the latest and best available which are reasonably comprehensive. Some are a little old, for example the primary energy supply statistics are from 2007.

The worst countries on this scale generally use massive quantities of natural resources in an unsustainable manner and have populations that are rising quickly. Turkmenistan and United Arab Emirates have only a tiny percentage of their primary energy supply sourced from renewables (both under 0.03%). Equatorial Guinea saw its CO2 emissions per person rise by 11% between 1970-2008, the second highest in the world after Bhutan. Incredibly for an island, under 13% of those in Haiti believe that human activity is causing global warming, whilst only 29% believe it in United Arab Emirates and Turkmenistan.

The best countries are not better in all criteria but normally excel in a few categories. Iceland produces 82% of its primary energy supply through renewable sources. Its CO2 emissions per person rose only by 0.1 percent. It more than doubled its forested area between 1990 and 2008. Switzerland reduced its CO2 emissions per person by 0.5% and also increased its forested areas.

1.4. Forest Area Change 1990-2015 (2015) Iceland, Bahrain, Uruguay

#central_african_republic #china

Forest Area Change 1990-2015
Higher is better

%6
1Iceland205.6
2Bahrain144.4
3Uruguay131.3
4Kuwait81.2
5Dominican Rep.79.5
6Egypt65.9
7Vietnam65.6
8Ireland62.2
9Tunisia61.9
10Cuba56.9
11Cape Verde55.7
12Rwanda50.9
13Bhutan34.7
14Azerbaijan34.6
15Spain33.2
16China32.6
17Montenegro32.1
18Syria32.1
19UAE31.7
20Samoa31.5
q=184.
Forest Area Change 1990-2015
Higher is better

%6
184Togo-72.6
183Nigeria-59.4
182Uganda-56.4
181Mauritania-45.9
180Honduras-43.6
179Pakistan-41.7
178Niger-41.3
177Korea, N.-38.7
176Sudan-37.5
175Zimbabwe-36.6
174Nicaragua-31.0
173El Salvador-29.7
172Mali-29.5
171Timor-Leste (E. Timor)-29.0
170Paraguay-27.6
169Chad-27.3
168Cambodia-26.9
167Myanmar (Burma)-25.9
166Guatemala-25.4
165Benin-25.2
q=184.

The World Wildlife Foundation says that 119-150km2 of forest is lost each year - "equivalent to 48 football fields every minute". They say:

Forests around the world are under threat from deforestation [which] comes in many forms, including fires, clear-cutting for agriculture, ranching and development, unsustainable logging for timber, and degradation due to climate change. This impacts people´s livelihoods and threatens a wide range of plant and animal species. [...]

Many of the world's most threatened and endangered animals live in forests, and 1.6 billion people rely on benefits forests offer, including food, fresh water, clothing, traditional medicine and shelter. [...] Forests play a critical role in mitigating climate change because they act as a carbon sink - soaking up carbon dioxide that would otherwise be free in the atmosphere and contribute to ongoing changes in climate patterns. Deforestation undermines this important carbon sink function. It is estimated that 15% of all greenhouse gas emissions are the result of deforestation.

World Wildlife Foundation (2017)7

In the international data table here, negative numbers means total forested area is shrinking in that country. Between 1990 and 2008 Sierra Leone lost 11% of its forest area, for example. Central African Republic lost 2.3%. Since 2008 China has been striving to meet a "2020 target for expanding the nation's forests to cover 23 percent of its landmass to combat climate change and soil erosion"8 and the United Nations reports that between 1990 and 2015, China increased its total forested area by one third.

1.5. Global Peace Index (2012) Iceland, New Zealand, Denmark

#denmark #iceland #somalia #sri_lanka #switzerland #syria

Global Peace Index (2012)
Lower is better
9
1Iceland1.11
2New Zealand1.24
3Denmark1.24
4Canada1.32
5Japan1.33
6Austria1.33
7Ireland1.33
8Slovenia1.33
9Finland1.35
10Switzerland1.35
11Belgium1.38
12Qatar1.40
13Czech Rep.1.40
14Sweden1.42
15Germany1.42
16Portugal1.47
17Hungary1.48
18Norway1.48
19Bhutan1.48
20Malaysia1.49
q=157.
Global Peace Index (2012)
Lower is better
9
157Somalia3.39
156Afghanistan3.25
155Sudan3.19
154Iraq3.19
153Congo, DR3.07
152Russia2.94
151Korea, N.2.93
150Central African Rep.2.87
149Israel2.84
148Pakistan2.83
147Syria2.83
146Libya2.83
145Nigeria2.80
144Chad2.67
143Colombia2.63
142Yemen2.60
141India2.55
140Georgia2.54
139Zimbabwe2.54
138Myanmar (Burma)2.53
q=157.

"The 2012 Global Peace Index is the sixth edition of the world's leading study on global levels of peacefulness. The GPI ranks 158 nations using 23 qualitative and quantitative indicators from highly respected sources, which gauge three broad themes: the level of safety and security in society; the extent of domestic or international conflict; and the degree of militarisation. By generating new information on the state of peace at the national and global level, the Institute for Economics and Peace hopes to make a valuable contribution to better understanding how civil society, researchers, policymakers, and government can create a more peaceful society."

GPI Fact Sheet

Other comments on the creation of the Peace Index:

The Dalai Lama said that he hoped the index would encourage countries to strive for peace. "Compiling and maintaining an index of which countries are the most peaceful and publishing the results will undoubtedly make the factors and qualities that contribute to that status better known and will encourage people to foster them in their own countries," he said.

The Guardian (2007)10

Despite the positive appeal of the Global Peace Index, it is imperfect and as with all international statistics, some countries appear to have a natural advantage. In this case, it is small countries which exist inside regional blocs, where their bigger neighbours spend on defence. You can't invade Denmark (2nd) or Switzerland (12th) without stepping on the toes of many other countries which have meatier defences, so there is less incentive for those countries to invest in defence. Although note that of course defence spending is only one of the many factors considered by the GPI, it is easy to imagine that a country such as Israel (151st), surrounded by aggressive neighbours, could never score well on this index.

1.6. Charitability (2013-6) Myanmar, USA, New Zealand

#finland #myanmar_(burma) #norway #sweden #USA

Personal Charitability
(World Position, 2013-2016)
Lower is better
11
1Myanmar (Burma)1.25
2USA1.5
3New Zealand3.5
4Canada3.75
5Australia5.25
6UK6.75
7Ireland6.75
8Sri Lanka8
9Qatar9
10Trinidad & Tobago10
11Netherlands10
12UAE12
13Bahrain13
14Norway13.33
15Malta14
16Indonesia14.75
17Iceland16
18Bhutan17.5
19Kenya17.75
20Jamaica20.5
q=156.
The Charities Aid Foundation (CAF) produces annual statistical analysis of personal charitable acts by individual individuals. It takes into account the helping of strangers, donations to charity and charitable volunteer work. Myanmar and the USA's people are commendable for their generosity. The ratings system is however biased towards grassroots-charitability and because of this, it is not wise to draw moral conclusions from the data. Some countries have a top-down approach to social aid. For example, in highly socialist countries such as Finland, Norway and Sweden the government itself is paid by citizens (through very high taxes) to engage in a lot of social work. Therefore there is a culture in which individuals feel they already contribute to charity - a charitable social safety net is centralized and organized, and well funded, but is not reflected in Charities Aid Foundation ratings. Some of those countries do score highest in measurements of how much aid is given to developing countries. Conversely, some of the lowest-ranking countries are clearly suffering from extreme poverty, and may lack the infrastructure that let's people volunteer time or give to charity.

See: "Charity Across the World" by Vexen Crabtree (2017).

1.7. Religion Importance (2009) Estonia, Sweden, Denmark

#christianity #estonia #europe #france #islam #judaism #malta #religion

Religiosity (2009)
Lower is better
%12
1Estonia16
2Sweden17
3Denmark19
4Japan24
5Hong Kong24
6UK27
7France30
8Vietnam30
9Russia34
10Belarus34
11Latvia39
12Luxembourg39
13Hungary39
14Albania39
15Germany40
16Switzerland41
17Uruguay41
18Lithuania42
19Canada42
20Korea, S.43
q=114.
Disbelief In God (2007)
Higher is better13
1Vietnam81
2Japan65
3Sweden64
4Czech Rep.61
5Estonia49
6Denmark48
7France44
8Belgium43
9Netherlands42
10Germany42
11UK42
12Cuba40
13Slovenia35
14Bulgaria34
15Hungary32
16Norway31
17Korea, S.30
18Finland28
19Russia27
20Australia25
q=137.

High rates of religion are associated with many inequalities and problems, for example male-dominated society and abuse of women, and gender inequality, poor adoption of human rights and anti-science and poor education policies. The Gallup (2009) data used here is used by the Social and Moral Index formula to grant points based on areligiosity. The data set on belief in god is only informational, as such personal beliefs are not the same thing as organised, endemic religion.

Over the last 60 years, religion in Europe has seen a strong decline. On average throughout the 27 EU countries, only half of its people believe in God14 and 25.4% directly say that they have no religion15. There is much variation from country to country. Only 16% of the populace of Estonia believe in God and the Scandinavian countries are highly atheist. But 95% believe in Malta. Two main social groups are particularly prone to belief in God; those over 55 years old and those whose education did not proceed beyond the 15-year-old stage.14. For a discussion on secularisation in general, see: "Secularisation Theory: Will Modern Society Reject Religion? What is Secularism?" by Vexen Crabtree

Despite the low rate of belief in God, many Europeans still claim to belong to theistic religions. 49.5% of the population of Europe say they are Catholic Christian, 15.7% say they're Muslim, 12.7% say they're Protestant Christian, 8.6% say they're Orthodox Christian and 0.4% say they are Jewish15. These numbers mean that at least 30% of Europeans are putting down a religion despite not believing in the very basic first principal of the religion they put down. In some places, this percent is higher. In France only 52% of Catholic believe in God and "only 18 percent define God according to the teachings of the Catholic Church"16. This is all because most people in Europe confuse religion and cultural heritage, and for many the actual beliefs of a religion don't really matter. For a discussion of this, see: "Institutionalized Religions Have Their Numbers Inflated by National Polls" by Vexen Crabtree.

Links:

2. The Criteria: Health (Year) Winners

#health

2.7. Adolescent Birth Rate (2015) N. Korea, S. Korea, Switzerland

#birth_control #health #population #sexuality

Adolescent Birth Rate (2015)
Lower is better

Per 100017
1Korea, N.0.5
2Korea, S.1.6
3Switzerland2.9
4Hong Kong3.2
5Slovenia3.8
6Singapore3.8
7Netherlands4.0
8Denmark4.0
9Japan4.1
10Cyprus5.0
11Sweden5.7
12Norway5.9
13Luxembourg5.9
14Italy6.0
15Iceland6.1
16Libya6.2
17Finland6.5
18Germany6.7
19Maldives6.7
20Tunisia6.8
q=185.
Adolescent Birth Rate (2015)
Lower is better

Per 100017
185Niger202.4
184Mali174.6
183Angola164.3
182Guinea140.6
181Mozambique139.7
180Malawi136.2
179Ivory Coast135.5
178Chad133.5
177Congo, DR122.6
176Tanzania118.6
175Sierra Leone118.2
174Congo, (Brazzaville)117.7
173Madagascar116.2
172Gambia113.0
171Uganda111.9
170Nigeria110.6
169Zimbabwe109.7
168Liberia108.8
167Equatorial Guinea108.7
166Burkina Faso108.5
q=185.

In a world with over 7.5 billion people on it (almost doubling in my generation alone), quality is more important than quantity. Education and wisdom take time to develop, and teenage pregnancies are recognized by most governments as a cause of deprivation and a health concern. The statistics given here from the "Human Development Report" by United Nations (2017) show the birth rate in women aged 15-19. Unfortunately, although children of a younger age also go through pregnancy, statistics are not widely available.

2.8. Alcohol Consumption (2010) 4-country draw

#alcohol #health #sociology

Alcohol Consumption (2010)
Lower is better

Per Capita18
1Libya0.1
2Pakistan0.1
3Kuwait0.1
4Mauritania0.1
5Comoros0.2
6Saudi Arabia0.2
7Bangladesh0.2
8Yemen0.3
9Niger0.3
10Egypt0.4
11Iraq0.5
12Somalia0.5
13Senegal0.6
14Timor-Leste (E. Timor)0.6
15Indonesia0.6
16Guinea0.7
17Afghanistan0.7
18Jordan0.7
19Myanmar (Burma)0.7
20Bhutan0.7
q=191.
Alcohol Consumption (2010)
Lower is better

Per Capita18
171Ireland11.9
170Luxembourg11.9
169Germany11.8
168UK11.6
167Slovenia11.6
166Denmark11.4
165Bulgaria11.4
164Spain11.2
163S. Africa11.0
162Belgium11.0
161Gabon10.9
160New Zealand10.9
159Namibia10.8
158Switzerland10.7
157St Lucia10.4
156Estonia10.3
155Kazakhstan10.3
154Greece10.3
153Austria10.3
152Canada10.2
q=191.

There is nothing wrong with drinking modest and sensible amounts of alcohol but fitness, physical health, mental health and long-term health all suffer as a result of medium- or heavy- drinking19 and the health risks to the baby when pregnant mothers drink20 are well-known. Aside from the effects on the individual, alcohol misuse impacts on entire economies21 via increased health service costs, policing costs and lost days' work. Worldwide, alcohol misuse is "among the top five risk factors for disease, disability and death" and is a "cause of more than 200 disease and injury conditions in individuals, most notably alcohol dependence, liver cirrhosis, cancers and injuries"22. "In 2012... 5.9% of all global deaths, were attributable to alcohol consumption"23. Deaths from chronic alcohol misuse have been rising for decades, and so has violence, abuse, vandalism and crime all associated with alcohol over-use. The aggression and crime associated with alcohol in some Western countries infringes on the human rights of those who want nothing to do with such behaviour. Many of the social effects of alcohol are psychological and cultural; i.e., people don't have to behave criminally or destructively whilst drunk - it is a culturally learned behaviour. Experiments have shown that behaviour can be controlled: Those who do not wish to behave badly whilst drunk, will not do so.

"Alcohol: The Social & Medical Effects and How to Combat Misuse" by Vexen Crabtree (2015)

2.9. Infant Vaccinations (2011-5) Hungary, China, Uzbekistan

#china #czech_republic #disease #health #hungary #ireland #italy #mongolia #netherlands #niue #UK #uzbekistan #vaccines

Infant Immunizations 2011-2015 (2015)
Higher is better

Avg %24
1Hungary99.0
2China99.0
3Uzbekistan98.9
4Niue98.8
5Mongolia98.7
6Czech Rep.98.7
7Seychelles98.6
8Korea, S.98.6
9Sri Lanka98.4
10St Lucia98.2
11Bahrain98.2
12Iran98.1
13Finland98.1
14Saudi Arabia98.0
15Luxembourg98.0
16Oman98.0
17Antigua & Barbuda98.0
18Cuba97.9
19Belgium97.8
20Thailand97.8
q=194.
Infant Immunizations 2011-2015 (2015)
Higher is better

Avg %24
194Equatorial Guinea36.8
193S. Sudan45.7
192Somalia46.0
191Central African Rep.49.4
190Nigeria50.0
189Chad52.5
188Ukraine55.2
187Syria62.4
186Guinea63.3
185Vanuatu65.5
184Haiti65.7
183Papua New Guinea66.3
182Yemen67.4
181Samoa68.1
180Niger69.7
179Afghanistan70.6
178Iraq70.7
177Madagascar71.9
176Angola71.9
175S. Africa72.5
q=194.

Immunization to many diseases can be obtained through vaccination. By comparing international statistics on seven easily preventable diseases, it is easily seen that good policies on national health is not simply the preserve of the rich: the best countries at immunizing infants are Hungary, China, Uzbekistan, Niue, Mongolia and the Czech Republic25. The seven diseases are: diphtheria, haemophilus influenza type b (hib), hepatitis B, measles pertussis (whooping cough), polio, tetanus (and neonatal tetanus) and tuberculosis (TB), and all of them are serious and can result in suffering, lasting harm, permanent disabilities, and often death, if not treated properly. Where mass immunizations are effected, incidences of these diseases can fall by up to 90%, and in many cases immunizations have completely eradicated national occurences of certain diseases.

Unfortunately, the Western world is suffering from an era of mass-media-led misinformation when it comes to some vaccines and immunizations26. UK sensationalist newspapers in the 1990s made claims about associations between some vaccines and autism (with no evidence to support it) leading to a rapid drop in acceptance of vaccines. Measles and mumps rates shot up by thousands of times. Epidemics between 2005 and 201327 saw total numbers approaching 10,000 cases, starting off with "prolonged outbreaks in travelling and religious communities, where vaccine uptake has been historically low"28. Similar trends in the Netherlands in 1999 meant 2,300 cases emerged in a specific community that is "philosophically opposed to vaccination", resulting in deaths29. Ireland saw a surge to 1500 cases in the year 2000 including three deaths30, and Italy suffered three deaths too29. For developed countries to see these preventable diseases' numbers rise in this way is embarrassing, and indicates a loss of cultural wisdom.

"Immunizations: International Statistics on Vaccines and the Autism Scare" by Vexen Crabtree (2017)

For more detail on immunizations and the statistics used for this data, see the full page: "Immunizations: International Statistics on Vaccines and the Autism Scare" by Vexen Crabtree (2017).

2.10. Fertility Rates (2012) N. Korea, Brunei, St.Vincent & Gren.

#birth_control #health #population

Highest Fertility Rates (2013)
2.0 is best
31
180Niger6.96
179Somalia6.30
178Zambia6.30
177Mali6.16
176Afghanistan6.03
175Timor-Leste (E. Timor)5.99
174Malawi5.98
173Uganda5.95
172Chad5.79
171Burkina Faso5.77
170Congo, DR5.54
169Tanzania5.51
168Nigeria5.45
167Rwanda5.30
166Angola5.19
165Benin5.12
164Liberia5.08
163Guinea5.08
162Equatorial Guinea5.02
161Yemen4.98
q=180.

The fertility rate is, in simple terms, the average amount of children that each woman has. The higher the figure, the quicker the population is growing, although, to calculate the rate you also need to take into account morbidity, i.e., the rate at which people die. If people live healthy and long lives and morbidity is low, then, 2.0 approximates to the replacement rate, which would keep the population stable. If all countries had such a fertility rate, population growth would end. The actual replacement rate in most developed countries is around 2.1.

In order to calculate the points for each country, I had to pick an optimum fertility rate, and then detract points as countries strayed from it. I have opted for the round figure of 2.0, slightly lower than the replacement rate, because the population right now is too high, therefore, the best fertility rate is probably one that will see a gradual decline in population numbers, at least for a few hundred years. The decline cannot be fast however, as this tends to create severe economic problems. So, any country that is either below 2.0 or above 2.0 loses points.

2.11. Life Expectancy (2015) Hong Kong, Japan, Italy

Life Expectancy (2015)
Higher is better

Years32
21Portugal81.18
22Germany81.09
23Greece81.07
24Ireland81.05
25Finland81.01
26Belgium80.98
27UK80.85
28Malta80.73
29Slovenia80.58
30Denmark80.41
31Cyprus80.33
32Liechtenstein80.16
33Costa Rica79.61
34Cuba79.57
35Lebanon79.54
36USA79.22
37Brunei79.02
38Czech Rep.78.78
39Qatar78.32
40Albania77.97
q=190.
Life Expectancy (2015)
Higher is better

Years32
1Hong Kong84.16
2Japan83.68
3Italy83.34
4Singapore83.21
5Switzerland83.13
6Spain82.77
7Iceland82.72
8Israel82.56
9Australia82.54
10France82.36
11Sweden82.35
12Canada82.22
13Korea, S.82.13
14New Zealand82.03
15Chile81.96
16Luxembourg81.88
17Norway81.71
18Netherlands81.71
19Austria81.58
20Andorra81.46
q=190.

The United Nations Human Development Report contains data on the Life Expectancy at Birth. Japan topped this table for very many years; for example in 1989 its average life expectancy was 78.6 which was higher than any other country33. Now, Hong Kong in the south of China has reached a new pinnacle. Life expectancy reflects overall cultural health, including diet, the health services systems, attitudes to exercise and well being, and also family structure and caring. Life expectancy stats are sometimes skewed by taking into account immigration, so that much of the time stats are compiled of natural-born inhabitants only.

Links:

2.12. Smoking Rates (2015) Guinea, Solomon Islands, Kiribati

Smoking Rates (2014)
Lower is better
34
1Guinea 15
2Solomon Islands 26
3Kiribati 28
4Uganda 41
5Rwanda 53
6Samoa 54
7Congo, DR 74
8Ethiopia 76
9Vanuatu 76
10Guyana 77
11Suriname 79
12Malawi 80
13Tonga 81
14Mozambique 82
15Nepal 83
16Afghanistan 84
17Lesotho 88
18Trinidad & Tobago 97
19Burundi 98
20Tanzania 101
q=182.
Smoking Rates (2014)
Lower is better
34
182Montenegro4 125
181Belarus3 831
180Lebanon3 023
179Macedonia2 732
178Russia2 690
177Slovenia2 637
176Belgium2 353
175Luxembourg2 284
174China2 250
173Bosnia & Herzegovina2 233
172Czech Rep.2 194
171Kazakhstan2 157
170Azerbaijan2 114
169Greece2 086
168Korea, S.2 073
167Austria1 988
166Jordan1 855
165Ukraine1 854
164Estonia1 775
163Hungary1 759
q=182.

See: The Side Effects of Smoking. Which Countries Smoke Most?.

3. The Criteria: Human Rights & Equality (Year) Winners

3.12. Antisemitism (2014) Laos, Philippines, Sweden

#antisemitism #christianity #germany #indonesia #israel #jordan #judaism #laos #morocco #netherlands #pakistan #philippines #religion #religious_violence #saudi_arabia #spain #sweden #turkey #UK #vietnam

Anti-Semite Opinions
Lower is better

%35
1Laos0
2Philippines3
3Sweden4
4Netherlands5
5Vietnam6
6UK8
7Denmark9
8USA9
9Tanzania12
10Thailand13
11Czech Rep.13
12Canada14
13New Zealand14
14Australia14
15Norway15
16Ghana15
17Finland15
18Brazil16
19Singapore16
20Nigeria16
q=101.
Anti-Semitism is the world given to irrational racism against Jews. It is not the same as anti-Judaism (involving arguments against the religion) nor the same as anti-Zionism (arguments against Israel). In history, influential Christian theologians concocted the arguments against Jews that led, very early on, to widespread Christian action against Jews36,37,38,39. As Christianity rose to power in the West and presided over the Dark Ages, there were widespread violent outbursts against Jews of the most persistent and horrible kind. The Crusades were frequently aimed at them and the feared Spanish Inquisition paid Jews particular attention. The horror of the holocaust instigated by German Nazis in the 1940s was followed (finally) by the era of European human rights and a movement against racism in general.

The places that are the least anti-Semitical are a few countries of south-east Asia (Laos, the Philippines and Vietnam) and some of the secular liberal democracies of Europe (Sweden, the Netherlands and the UK). The worst countries for antisemitism are Islamic states of the Middle East40, which are undergoing their own Dark Age. Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Morocco, Indonesia, Pakistan and Turkey see the most oppressive and violent actions towards Jews41,42. Jews in Muslim countries face a host of restrictions and "ceaseless humiliation and regular pogroms"43. In 2004 the European Union Monitoring Center on Racism and Xenophobia reported on violent anti-Jew crimes in the EU and found that that largest group of perpetrators were young Muslim males44.

See: "Anti-Semitism" by Vexen Crabtree (2017).

3.13. Gay Rights and Equality (2013) Netherlands, Belgium, Canada

#equality #homosexuality #human_rights #intolerance #sexuality #tolerance #UK #USA

Discrimination against Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) folk is rife across the world. LGBT folk face legal restrictions as well as social stigmatisation and violence45. LGBT tolerance and equal rights have been fought for country-by-country across the world, often against tightly entrenched cultural and religious opposition. Homosexual activity is outlawed in around 80 countries45. The International LGBT Equality Index was created to compare countries and regions, granting points to each country for a variety of factors including how long gay sex has been criminalized and the extent of equal LGBT rights. The signs in many developed countries are positive, and things are gradually improving. The Economist (2012) produced a graph (below) for the USA and UK, and stated that "the British Social Attitudes Survey shows that views of homosexuality started out tough and hardened in the mid-1980s - the period of the AIDS panic. Since then they have softened (see chart). The young are more liberal than their parents"46. Over time, the situation is improving. Europe is by far the developed morally, with Scandinavia in particular being exemplary. The Middle East is by far the worst place to be anything other than straight.

Links:

3.14. Nominal Commitment to Human Rights (2009) Argentina, 12-country draw

#bhutan #costa_rica #france #mexico

Nominal Commitment to HR (2009)
Higher is better

Treaties48
1Argentina24
2Chile23
3Costa Rica23
4Ecuador23
5Germany23
6Mexico23
7Peru23
8Spain23
9Slovenia23
10Paraguay23
11Serbia23
12Sweden23
13Uruguay23
14Italy22
15Denmark22
16Croatia22
17Belgium22
18Austria22
19Brazil21
20Montenegro21
q=194.
Nominal Commitment to HR (2009)
Higher is better

Treaties48
194Kiribati3
193Bhutan3
192Malaysia4
191Palau4
190Myanmar (Burma)4
189Marshall Islands4
188Nauru5
187Singapore5
186Micronesia5
185Tuvalu5
184Pakistan6
183Tonga6
182Brunei6
181St Lucia6
180UAE7
179Grenada7
178Sao Tome & Principe7
177Korea, N.7
176Indonesia7
175Eritrea8
q=194.

There are many international agreements on human rights, and, many mechanisms by which countries can be brought to account for their actions. Together, these have been the biggest historical movement in the fight against oppression and inhumanity. Or, putting it another way: these are rejected mostly by those who wish to oppress inhumanely. None of them are perfect and many people object to various components and wordings, but, no-one has come up with, and enforced, better methods of controlling the occasional desires that states and peoples have of causing angst for other states and peoples in a violent, unjust or inhumane way. Points are awarded for the number of human rights agreements ratified by the country, plus the acceptance of the petition mechanisms for disputes. The maximum possible score is 24.

This ranking is comprised of the 8 core United Nations International Human Rights Treaties and their Optional Protocols, individual petition mechanisms under ICCPR, ICERD, CAT, CEDAW and CRPD, the Genocide Convention, the 1949 Geneva Conventions and its two Additional Protocols, the Refugee Convention and its Protocol and the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court.

Argentina is, at this time, the only state that has ratified all of the treaties and accepted all the individual petition mechanisms. The Latin American and the Caribbean Group (GRULAC) has the highest number of ratifications, with 8 out of the 12 states ranking 1st and 2nd coming from the region. Western European and Others Group make up the other four states ranked second. The bottom end of the chart is made up predominantly of Asian states or small island states. Bhutan and Kiribati have the lowest ranking at just three ratifications each. Both have ratified the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women and the 1949 Geneva Conventions.

Two of the five permanent members of the Security Council - France and the United Kingdom - are in the top five and two current non-permanent members - Costa Rica and Mexico - are joint second. Of the permanent members, the "The United States of America" by Vexen Crabtree (2013) scores the lowest with a ranking of 17. The Top 5 of the United Nations Development Index of 2008 are also in the top five of the Ratifications by Country list.

NCHR Report (2009)

3.15. Personal, Civil and Economic Freedom (2014) Hong Kong, Switzerland, New Zealand

Personal, Civil & Economic Freedom (2014)
Lower is better

Rank49
1Hong Kong1
2Switzerland2
3New Zealand3
4Ireland4
5Denmark5
6UK6
7Canada6
8Australia6
9Finland9
10Netherlands10
11Luxembourg11
12Austria11
13Norway13
14Germany13
15Sweden15
16Malta16
17Belgium17
18Czech Rep.18
19Portugal19
20Lithuania20
q=159.

The Human Freedom Index published by the Fraser Institute is...

... a broad measure of human freedom, understood as the absence of coercive constraint. It uses 79 distinct indicators of personal and economic freedom in the following areas: Rule of Law, Security and Safety, Movement, Religion, Association, Assembly, and Civil Society, Expression, Relationships, Size of Government, Legal System and Property Rights, Access to Sound Money, Freedom to Trade Internationally, Regulation of Credit, Labor, and Business. [...]

The highest levels of freedom are in Western Europe, Northern Europe, and North America (Canada and the United States. The lowest levels are in the Middle East and North Africa, South Asia, and sub-Saharan Africa. [...]

Countrie in the top quartile of freedom enjoy a significant higher per capita income ($37,147) [compared with] the least-free quartile [at] $8,700). The HFI finds a strong correlation between human freedom and democracy.

"The Human Freedom Index" by The Fraser Institute (2016)

3.16. Slavery (2013) Joint: UK, Ireland, Iceland

#spain

Slavery (2013)
Higher is better

Rank50
Slaves (2013)
Lower is better

Slaves50
1UK1604426
2Iceland16022
3Ireland160321
4New Zealand159495
5Switzerland1501040
6Belgium1501448
7Luxembourg15069
8Norway150652
9Sweden1501237
10Austria1501100
q=162.
Slavery (2013)
Higher is better

Rank50
Slaves (2013)
Lower is better

Slaves50
162Mauritania1151353
161Haiti2209165
160Pakistan32127132
159India413956010
158Nepal5258806
157Moldova633325
156Benin780371
155Ivory Coast8156827
154Gambia914046
153Gabon1013707
q=162.

The Global Slavery Index was published for the first time in 2013. The rankings result from the estimated number of slaves as a percent of the population of the country, "a measure of child marriage, and a measure of human trafficking in and out of a country. [...] The data on the level of human trafficking in and out of a country were taken from the US Trafficking in Persons report whilst the child marriage numbers are from UNICEF"51.

I did consider researching when each country abolished slavery and giving each a point per year, therefore rewarding those countries that were first to abolish it. Then, I would give this historical ranking a 50% weight, and give the Global Slavery Index a 50% weight. However, it is clear that countries that were involved in slavery were the first to come to abolish it (e.g. Spain in 1542), and therefore, such a historical index would be unfair.

Links:

3.17. Women Stand for Election & Vote (1893+) New Zealand, Australia, Finland

#new_zealand

Year Women Can Vote
Lower is better

Year52
1New Zealand1893
2Australia1902
3Finland1906
4Norway1913
5Denmark1915
6Iceland1915
7Russia1917
8Latvia1918
9Estonia1918
10Kyrgyzstan1918
11Austria1919
12Slovakia1919
13Belarus1919
14Germany1919
15Netherlands1919
16Ukraine1919
17Luxembourg1919
18Czech Rep.1919
19Poland1919
20Canada1920
q=189.

Women now have equal rights in the vast majority of countries across the world.

Although literature talks of countries granting the "women's right to vote", in a democracy where all people have a voice in government it is more the case that women are "no longer denied their right to vote" rather than being "granted" a right that they already had, but, were denied.

The opposition to women's ability to vote in equality with man was most consistently and powerfully opposed by the Catholic Church, various other Christian organisations, Islamic authorities and some other religious and secular traditionalists.

3.18. Gender Inequality (2015) Switzerland, Denmark, Netherlands

Most Discriminatory (2015)
Lower is better17
159Yemen0.77
158Niger0.70
157Chad0.69
156Mali0.69
155Ivory Coast0.67
154Afghanistan0.67
153Congo, DR0.66
152Tonga0.66
151Sierra Leone0.65
150Liberia0.65
149Central African Rep.0.65
148Gambia0.64
147Mauritania0.63
146Burkina Faso0.62
145Malawi0.61
144Benin0.61
143Papua New Guinea0.59
142Haiti0.59
141Congo, (Brazzaville)0.59
140Sudan0.57
q=159.
Most Equal (2015)
Lower is better17
1Switzerland0.04
2Denmark0.04
3Netherlands0.04
4Sweden0.05
5Iceland0.05
6Norway0.05
7Slovenia0.05
8Finland0.06
9Germany0.07
10Korea, S.0.07
11Singapore0.07
12Belgium0.07
13Luxembourg0.07
14Austria0.08
15Spain0.08
16Italy0.08
17Portugal0.09
18Canada0.10
19France0.10
20Israel0.10
q=159.

The UN Human Development Reports include statistics on gender equality which take into account things like maternal mortality, access to political power (seats in parliament) and differences between male and female education rates. These are not factored into the HDI, therefore, countries get a separate range of points on my Social and Moral Development Index.

Gender inequality is not a necessary part of early human development. Although a separation of roles is almost universal due to different strengths between the genders, this does not have to mean that women are subdued, and, such patriarchialism is not universal in ancient history. Those cultures and peoples who shed, or never developed, the idea that mankind ought to dominate womankind, are better cultures and peoples than those who, even today, cling violently to those mores.

See:

3.19. Press Freedom Index (2013) Finland, Netherlands, Norway

#democracy #eritrea #finland #korea,_north #mass_media #netherlands #norway #turkmenistan #UK

Press Freedom (2013)
Lower is better
53
1Finland638
2Netherlands648
3Norway652
4Luxembourg668
5Andorra682
6Denmark708
7Liechtenstein735
8New Zealand838
9Iceland849
10Sweden923
11Estonia926
12Austria940
13Jamaica988
14Switzerland994
15Ireland1006
16Czech Rep.1017
17Germany1024
18Costa Rica1208
19Namibia1250
20Canada1269
q=178.
Press Freedom (2013)
Lower is better
53
178Eritrea8483
177Korea, N.8390
176Turkmenistan7914
175Syria7853
174Somalia7359
173Iran7340
172China7307
171Vietnam7178
170Cuba7164
169Sudan7006
168Yemen6922
167Laos6799
166Djibouti6740
165Equatorial Guinea6720
164Bahrain6275
163Uzbekistan6039
162Saudi Arabia5688
161Sri Lanka5659
160Rwanda5546
159Kazakhstan5508
q=178.

Scores are calculated according to indicators including pluralism - the degree to which opinions are represented in the media, media independence of authorities, self-censorship, legislation, transparency and the infrastructure that supports news and information, and, the level of violence against journalists which includes lengths of imprisonments. The index "does not take direct account of the kind of political system but it is clear that democracies provide better protection for the freedom to produce and circulate accurate news and information than countries where human rights are flouted."

"The same three European countries that headed the index last year hold the top three positions again this year. For the third year running, Finland has distinguished itself as the country that most respects media freedom. It is followed by the Netherlands and Norway. [At the bottom are the] same three as last year - Turkmenistan, North Korea and Eritrea".

It must be noted that press freedom is not an indicator of press quality and the press itself can be abusive; the UK suffers in particular from a popular brand of nasty reporting that infuses several of its newspapers who are particularly prone to running destructive and often untrue campaigns against victims. The Press Freedom Index notes that "the index should in no way be taken as an indicator of the quality of the media in the countries concerned".

Links:

4. The Criteria: Modernity (Year) Winners

4.20. Freedom On The Net (2012) Estonia, USA, Germany

#bahrain #ethiopia #pakistan

Freedom On The Internet (2012)
Lower is better
54
1Estonia10
2USA12
3Germany15
4Australia18
5Hungary19
6Philippines23
7Italy23
8UK25
9S. Africa26
10Argentina26
11Ukraine27
12Brazil27
13Kenya29
14Georgia30
15Nigeria33
16Korea, S.34
17Uganda34
18Kyrgyzstan35
19Mexico37
20India39
q=47.
Freedom On The Internet (2012)
Lower is better
54
47Iran90
46Cuba86
45China85
44Syria83
43Uzbekistan77
42Ethiopia75
41Myanmar (Burma)75
40Vietnam73
39Bahrain71
38Saudi Arabia71
37Belarus69
36Pakistan63
35Thailand61
34Egypt59
33Kazakhstan58
32Sri Lanka55
31Zimbabwe54
30Russia52
29Rwanda51
28Azerbaijan50
q=47.

This is an important category as internet access allows access to varied sources of information outside of state influence, and access to the information age is a massive boost to personal liberty and personal potential. Scores are derived from these categories:

  1. "Obstacles to Access: assesses infrastructural and economic barriers to access; governmental efforts to block specific applications or technologies; and legal, regulatory and ownership control over internet and mobile phone access providers."
  2. "Limits on Content: examines filtering and blocking of websites; other forms of censorship and self-censorship; manipulation of content; the diversity of online news media; and usage of digital media for social and political activism."
  3. "Violations of User Rights: measures legal protections and restrictions on online activity; surveillance; privacy; and repercussions for online activity, such as legal prosecution, imprisonment, physical attacks, or other forms of harassment."

14 countries improved their stance on allowing access to the Internet uncensored by political or ideological bias, since last year. Bahrain, Pakistan, and Ethiopia saw the biggest increases in authoritarian behaviour. In many countries, imprisonment and violence against journalists and bloggers increased, and Pakistan's infamous blasphemy laws were increasingly enforced for online behaviour, reducing its ranking somewhat. "Only 4 of the 20 countries that recently experienced declines are considered electoral democracies. [...]"

"Regimes are covertly hiring armies of pro-government bloggers to tout the official point of view, discredit opposition activists, or disseminate false information about unfolding events [and] over the last year, it has been adopted in more than a quarter of the countries examined. The Bahraini authorities, for example, have employed hundreds of "trolls" whose responsibility is to scout popular domestic and international websites, and while posing as ordinary users, attack the credibility of those who post information that reflects poorly on the government."

Also see:

4.21. Internet Users in Population (2017) Iceland, Norway, Bermuda

Internet Users (2016)
Higher is better
55
1Iceland100%
2Faroe Islands99%
3Norway98%
4Bermuda97%
5Andorra97%
6Denmark96%
7Liechtenstein96%
8Luxembourg95%
9Netherlands94%
10Sweden93%
11Monaco93%
12UK93%
13Finland93%
14Qatar92%
15UAE92%
16Bahrain92%
17Estonia91%
18Japan91%
19New Zealand89%
20USA89%
q=201.
Internet Users (2016)
Higher is better
55
201Eritrea1%
200Timor-Leste (E. Timor)1%
199Burundi2%
198Somalia2%
197Guinea2%
196Niger2%
195Sierra Leone2%
194Myanmar (Burma)3%
193Chad3%
192Guinea-Bissau4%
191Congo, DR4%
190Ethiopia4%
189Madagascar4%
188Central African Rep.5%
187Tanzania5%
186Benin6%
185Mozambique6%
184Malawi7%
183Afghanistan7%
182Comoros7%
q=201.

Internet access has become an essential research tool. It facilitates an endless list of life improvements, from the ability to network and socialize without constraint, to access to a seemingly infinite repository of technical and procedural information on pretty much any task. The universal availability of data has sped up industrial development and personal learning at the national and personal level. Individuals can read any topic they wish regardless of the locality of expert teachers, and, entire nations can develop their technology and understanding of the world simply because they are now exposed to advanced societies and moral discourses online. Like every communications medium, the Internet has issues and causes a small range of problems, but these are insignificant compared to the advantages of having an online populace.

4.22. IPv6 Uptake (2017) Belgium, Germany, Switzerland

#india

IPv6 Uptake (2017)
Higher is better

Ratio56
1Belgium55.4
2Germany41.8
3Switzerland35.1
4USA35.0
5Greece33.5
6Luxembourg32.4
7India26.8
8Portugal26.6
9Ireland26.1
10UK24.7
11Japan22.1
12France18.8
13Canada18.3
14Peru18.3
15Ecuador18.2
16Estonia17.6
17Malaysia16.5
18Norway14.7
19Australia14.6
20Trinidad & Tobago14.5
q=176.
IPv6 Uptake (2017)
Higher is better

Ratio56
21Finland14.1
22Brazil13.9
23Netherlands10.5
24Czech Rep.10.1
25New Zealand9.7
26Romania8.7
27Austria7.5
28Hungary7.4
29Guatemala6.9
30Saudi Arabia6.8
31Vietnam5.9
32Slovenia5.4
33Bolivia5.0
34Macau4.2
35Singapore4.0
36Sweden3.8
37Poland3.6
38Thailand3.3
39Denmark3.1
40Bosnia & Herzegovina3.1
q=176.

The time for preparation and transition is over: we should all be moving to IPv6. This is largely an issue for ISPs and large telecommunications companies, spurred on by government and citizen pressure. It is not good enough to ignore IPv6. Eventually when IPv4 support is removed from infrastructure, the entire network-of-networks (as well as individual networks) will run more smoothly and quicker. Don't hold up progress!

Sometimes, transition is a case of having to buy new equipment, but often the cost is tied up with having qualified administrators to make required configuration changes (and testing) on network devices. Because of this, the Social & Moral Development index only rates countries that have are at over $1,000 GDP per capita, in order to avoid punishing countries that are simply to poor and too troubled to modernize right now. Of the countries with the lowest GDP per Capita in the results, India performs very well indeed, proving to others that it can be done even where investments are spread thinly.

4.23. Malware and Email Spam (2010-2)

#russia

IT Security (2013)
Lower is better
57
81USA3.68
80Russia2.42
79India2.10
78Sudan1.98
77Bangladesh1.87
76Iraq1.84
75Oman1.72
74Sri Lanka1.67
73Angola1.61
72China1.59
71Maldives1.57
70Tanzania1.50
69Rwanda1.50
68Netherlands1.47
67Germany1.46
66Afghanistan1.45
65Nepal1.45
64Ukraine1.44
63Uganda1.44
62Mongolia1.42
q=81.

This index measures to what extent countries produce spam and malware. Spam has threatened to destroy the world's email systems and has certainly cost the IT industry billions in mitigation. "Malware" is malicious software, and the index takes into account the number of servers based in country that are Botnet CnC machines (which are bad), and the numbers of servers that host malicious downloads, including some of those associated with the infamous Blackhole crimepak.

Russia's authorities have historically been quite lax toward cybercriminals.

Kaspersky Labs (2012)

The index also includes measures of host-based virus-detection from removable devices such as USB drives. This measures the danger in running IT systems in those locations, and probably reflects badly on the society and governments level of understanding of IT security in general.

Being a source of spam or malware is gauged as being four times worse than the other factors considered, especially as detection and block actions from antivirus are a good thing and only indirectly give away the fact that the IT security of the local environment is bad.

The data comes from a range of IT security companies including AVG, Kaspersky, McAfee and Sophos, covering 2010, 2011 and 2012 reports. In total, 17 reports' data were accumulated for this index, in all cases listing the worst offenders. In all this data only 83 unique countries appeared. All countries not on these lists have been given full points on account of no news being good news!

The upside to this IT Security index is that countries that are host to malware score lowly, bringing down their average scores. The downside to this negative index is that over 100 countries scored top points and many of these are not countries that have excellent IT security, but merely are countries that do not have much IT infrastructure. Hopefully a positive measure of IT security will resolve this in the future.

4.24. Research & Development (2016) S.Korea, Israel, Japan

#countries #denmark #finland #israel #japan #korea,_south #politics #sweden #taiwan

Research and Development
Higher is better

% RDP PPP
1Korea, S.4.29
2Israel4.11
3Japan3.58
4Finland3.17
5Sweden3.16
6Denmark3.05
7Taiwan3.01
8Austria3.00
9Switzerland2.96
10Germany2.84
q=126.

Research and Development is a long-term boost to Human understanding: science improves our knowledge of the world, and new products such as better batteries for devices can improve our quality of lives. The world needs discoveries to help combat climate change, mitigate starvation and fight disease. The ten countries that commit most to Research and Development (as a percent of their GDP PPP) are mostly predictable; Japan, Finland, Sweden and Denmark top most developmental indices of any kind. Also in the list can be found technologically savvy South Korea and Taiwan and a few well-developed European countries. The only surprise (for some) is Israel, sitting 2nd in the list.

5. Table of Country Scores

Countries are only listed here if they appear in over 5 data sets otherwise their score could be inaccurate.

--- The Best ---
Points1
1Iceland84.1
2Sweden80.8
3Norway80.0
4Denmark79.4
5Belgium79.3
6Finland78.4
7Germany77.8
8Switzerland77.7
9Luxembourg77.7
10New Zealand77.4
11UK77.1
12Australia76.8
13Netherlands76.7
14Ireland76.5
15Canada75.9
16Hong Kong75.8
17Taiwan75.4
18Austria75.3
19Japan73.5
20France72.2
21Spain71.0
22Estonia70.7
23USA69.4
24Portugal69.0
25Italy68.7
26Czech Rep.68.4
27Korea, S.68.2
28Israel67.0
29Singapore66.9
30Slovenia66.9
31Maldives66.0
32Costa Rica66.0
33Uruguay65.4
34Latvia65.2
35Malta64.5
36Chile64.0
37Hungary63.4
38Poland63.0
39Bahamas62.9
40Lithuania62.9
41Brunei62.9
42Slovakia62.7
43Jamaica62.6
44Mauritius62.2
45Cyprus62.1
46Barbados61.9
47Argentina61.5
48St Vincent & Grenadines61.4
49Bhutan61.3
50Trinidad & Tobago61.1
51Brazil61.0
52Greece60.6
53Albania60.4
54Monaco60.2
55Andorra60.0
56Mongolia59.7
57Seychelles59.6
58Croatia59.6
59Liechtenstein59.3
60Mexico59.1
61Romania58.9
62Suriname58.8
63Peru58.8
64Fiji58.6
65Antigua & Barbuda58.6
66St Lucia57.7
q=198.
--- The Average ---
Points1
67Dominican Rep.57.6
68Malaysia57.4
69Panama57.2
70Bulgaria56.6
71Serbia56.4
72Uzbekistan56.3
73Macedonia56.3
74S. Africa56.3
75Qatar56.0
76Belize55.9
77Tajikistan55.8
78Bosnia & Herzegovina55.7
79Cuba55.6
80Turkey55.6
81Colombia55.5
82Philippines55.5
83Nicaragua55.1
84Kyrgyzstan55.1
85Kuwait55.0
86Vietnam54.7
87Georgia54.7
88Montenegro54.5
89Armenia54.5
90El Salvador54.3
91Sri Lanka54.2
92Grenada54.0
93Azerbaijan54.0
94Ecuador53.9
95Libya53.8
96Bahrain53.6
97Guatemala53.5
98Korea, N.53.5
99Tonga53.4
100Oman53.1
101Samoa53.0
102Cape Verde52.8
103Turkmenistan52.8
104Ukraine52.7
105Tunisia52.7
106Belarus52.7
107Paraguay52.7
108Lebanon52.2
109Bolivia52.2
110Thailand52.0
111UAE51.9
112Nepal51.8
113Dominica51.7
114Kazakhstan51.7
115Laos51.6
116Vanuatu51.5
117Guyana51.3
118Moldova51.0
119Venezuela50.9
120Morocco50.9
121Kenya50.7
122Haiti50.5
123Indonesia50.4
124Jordan50.4
125Russia50.2
126Honduras50.2
127Puerto Rico50.1
128Micronesia49.8
129Botswana49.6
130Ghana49.4
131Solomon Islands49.1
132Comoros49.0
q=198.
--- The Challenged ---
Points1
133India49.0
134Kiribati48.8
135China48.8
136St Kitts & Nevis48.6
137Namibia48.4
138Madagascar48.3
139Liberia48.1
140Algeria48.1
141Timor-Leste (E. Timor)48.1
142Rwanda47.7
143Bangladesh47.6
144Djibouti47.5
145Iran47.3
146Senegal47.2
147Sao Tome & Principe47.2
148S. Sudan47.1
149Egypt47.1
150Lesotho47.1
151Swaziland46.9
152Cambodia46.5
153Eritrea46.4
154Papua New Guinea46.2
155Saudi Arabia46.2
156Burkina Faso46.2
157Nauru45.5
158Tanzania45.3
159Myanmar (Burma)45.2
160Malawi44.9
161Uganda44.8
162Syria44.8
163Benin44.2
164Guinea-Bissau44.0
165San Marino44.0
166Mozambique43.9
167Guinea43.9
168Bermuda43.2
169Palau42.8
170Tuvalu42.8
171Zambia42.8
172Ethiopia42.7
173Cameroon42.7
174Gabon42.4
175Gambia42.2
176Zimbabwe41.9
177Ivory Coast41.8
178Congo, (Brazzaville)41.5
179Togo40.9
180Sierra Leone40.3
181Pakistan40.2
182Afghanistan40.0
183Burundi39.8
184Mali39.4
185Mauritania39.2
186Palestine38.9
187Nigeria38.8
188Iraq38.5
189Angola38.0
190Niger35.9
191Equatorial Guinea35.2
192Sudan35.2
193Central African Rep.35.0
194Congo, DR33.8
195Somalia33.1
196Yemen32.8
197Chad32.4
198Marshall Islands30.2
q=198.

6. Notes on Methodology

Results charts have the best 5 countries marked with a green number, and the worst 5 marked with a red one. If there is a tie, then, the markers extend for as long as the tie continues. Sometimes the actual points are calculated to many significant figures, but, the results are only shown for 3 s.f. and in these cases, it might look like the flags do not extend enough. To view the data in more detail hover over any row to view the precise points awarded.

For nearly all data sets, countries are ordered from best to worst and then given points depending on their rank. The worst country in any given data set gets 0 points, and the best gets 100 points.

I have considered giving the UN HDR's rankings double the importance (allowing countries to score 0-200 for this data, instead of 0-100), as it includes multiple factors. However, it is not primarily concerned with morality, and one if its 3 criteria spreads is purely financial. It includes schooling years, but, I intend on also including a more potent statistic on that topic, measuring more than just school-age achievements.

7. Previous Edition (2005-2007) Winners: Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, Finland and Germany

#belgium #canada #czech_republic #denmark #finland #france #germany #hong_kong #iceland #ireland #japan #luxembourg #netherlands #new_zealand #norway #singapore #sweden #switzerland #UK #USA

For old stats, view the archived page: "Which Countries Set the Best Examples? (Archived page from 2005-2007)" by Vexen Crabtree (2007).

The Best Countries
2005-2007
Q
#1 Sweden1683 pointsx20
#2 Denmark1598 pointsx20
#3 Netherlands1572 pointsx20
#4 Finland1514 pointsx20
#5 Germany1422 pointsx21
#6 UK1407 pointsx21
#7 Canada1373 pointsx19
#8 Switzerland1326 pointsx18
#9 Norway1320 pointsx17
#10 Belgium1208 pointsx19
  1. Human Development Index Norway, Iceland
  2. Global Peace Index Norway, New Zealand
  3. Gender Equality Sweden, Norway
  4. Life expectancy Japan, Hong Kong
  5. Quality of Life Ireland, Switzerland
  6. Most Competitive Economy Switzerland, Finland
  7. Economic Freedom Hong Kong, Singapore
  8. Gay Rights Sweden, Norway
  9. Obesity Japan, Korea
  10. Adults at High Literacy Level Sweden, Norway
  11. Environment
  12. Open Access to Research Sweden, Netherlands
  13. Asylum Seeker Acceptance Rates Denmark, Canada
  14. Aid to Developing Countries Norway, Luxembourg
  15. IT: Networked Readiness Index Denmark, Sweden
  16. IT: Computer Piracy Levels USA, New Zealand
  17. Secularisation Czech Republic & France

Current edition: 2017 Jun 2258
Fourth edition 2017 Apr 2559
Third edition 2017 Mar 2260
Second edition 2013
Originally published 2005
http://www.vexen.co.uk/countries/best.html
Parent page: The Human Truth Foundation

All #tags used on this page - click for more:

#alcohol #antisemitism #bahrain #belgium #bhutan #birth_control #canada #central_african_republic #china #christianity #costa_rica #countries #czech_republic #democracy #denmark #disease #equality #equatorial_guinea #eritrea #estonia #ethiopia #europe #finland #france #germany #haiti #health #homosexuality #hong_kong #human_rights #hungary #iceland #india #indonesia #intolerance #ireland #islam #israel #italy #japan #jordan #judaism #korea,_north #korea,_south #laos #longevity #luxembourg #malta #mass_media #mexico #mongolia #morocco #myanmar_(burma) #netherlands #new_zealand #niue #norway #pakistan #philippines #politics #population #religion #religious_violence #russia #saudi_arabia #sexuality #singapore #sociology #somalia #spain #sri_lanka #sweden #switzerland #syria #taiwan #tolerance #turkey #turkmenistan #UK #united_arab_emirates #USA #uzbekistan #vaccines #vietnam

Social Media

References: (What's this?)

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The Guardian. UK newspaper. See Which are the Best and Worst Newspapers in the UK?. Respectable and generally well researched UK broadsheet newspaper..

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Anti-Defamation League. (ADL)
(2014) ADL Global 100, Executive Summary. Accessed on global100.adl.org on 2017 Jan 02. The numbers given are of those who state that racist stereotyped statements about Jews are true; they have to agree to 6 or more of the 11 statements to be counted. An example statements is "Jews are hated because of the way they behave". The data was collected from 53,100 interviews across 101 countries plus the West Bank and Gaza. The global average is 26%.

Bawer, Bruce
(2006) While Europe Slept: How Radical Islam is Destroying the West from Within. Paperback book. Published by Broadway Books.

Beetham, David
(2005) Democracy: A Beginner's Guide. Paperback book. Published by Oneworld Publications, Oxford, UK.

British Medical Journal. Magazine. Published by the British Medical Association, Tavistock Square, London, UK. Weekly science magazine. In print since 1840CE. www.bmj.com.

Carroll, Robert Todd. (1945-2016). Taught philosophy at Sacramento City College from 1977 until retirement in 2007. Created The Skeptic's Dictionary in 1994.
(2011) Unnatural Acts: Critical Thinking, Skepticism, and Science Exposed!. E-book. Amazon Kindle digital edition. Published by the James Randi Educational Foundation.

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World Giving Index. On www.cafonline.org.

Clarke, Peter B.. Peter B. Clarke: Professor Emeritus of the History and Sociology of Religion, King's College, University of London, and currently Professor in the Faculty of Theology, University of Oxford, UK.
(2011) The Oxford Handbook of The Sociology of Religion. Paperback book. Originally published 2009. Current version published by Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.

Donnelly, Jack
(2013) Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice. 3rd edition. Published by Cornell University Press.

Gallup
(2009) Religiosity. gallup.com/poll/142727/.... The survey question was "Is religion an important part of your daily life?" and results are charted for those who said "yes". 1000 adults were polled in each of 114 countries.

Giddens, Anthony
(1997) Sociology. Hardback book. 3rd edition. Originally published 1989. Current version published by Polity Press in association with Blackwell Publishers Ltd. The Amazon link is to a newer version..

Goldacre, Ben. MD.
(2008) Bad Science. Published by Fourth Estate, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, London, UK.

Harris, Sam
(2006) The End of Faith: Religion, Terror and the Future of Reason. Paperback book. 2006 edition. Published in UK by The Great Free Press, 2005.

Heywood, Andrew
(2003) Political Ideologies. Paperback book. 3rd edition. Originally published 1992. Current version published by Palgrave MacMillan.

Hinnells, John R.. Currently professor of theology at Liverpool Hope University.
(1997, Ed.) The Penguin Dictionary of Religions. Paperback book. Originally published 1984. Current version published by Penguin Books, London, UK. References to this book simply state the title of the entry used.

Jones, Tim
(2010) Future Agenda: The World In 2020. Published by Infinite Ideas.

Kressel, Neil
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Lynn, Harvey & Nyborg
(2009) Average intelligence predicts atheism rates across 137 nations. Richard Lynn, John Harvey and Helmuth Nyborg article "Average intelligence predicts atheism rates across 137 nations" in Intelligence (2009 Jan/Feb) vol. 37 issue 1 pages 11-15. Online at www.sciencedirect.com, accessed 2009 Sep 15.

McCall, Andrew
(1979) The Medieval Underworld. Paperback book. 2004 edition. Published by Sutton Publishing.

Pessi, Anne Birgitta. Academy Research Fellow and Adjunct Professor at the Collegium for Advanced Studies at the University of Helsinki, Finland.
(2011) Religion and Social Problems: Individual and Institutional Responses. This essay is chapter 52 of "The Oxford Handbook of The Sociology of Religion" by Peter B. Clarke (2011) (pages 941-962).

Peters, Michael Dr
(2011) Family Doctor Home Advisor. Hardback book. 4th edition. Published by Dorling Kindersley Limited, London, UK. Published for the British Medical Association.

Public Health England. (PHE)
(2017) Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR): use of combined vaccine instead of single vaccines. published on www.gov.uk/government/. Accessed 2017 May 23..

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(1946) History of Western Philosophy. Paperback book. 2000 edition. Published by Routledge, London, UK.

The Fraser Institute
(2016) The Human Freedom Index. Published by The Cato Institute, The Fraser Institute and the Friedrich Naumann Foundation for Freedom. Covers data up to 2014. On www.fraserinstitute.org/.../human-freedom-index-2016..

The Independent. UK newspaper. See Which are the Best and Worst Newspapers in the UK?. Respectable and generally well researched UK broadsheet newspaper.

Thorn, Gill
(2003) Healthy Pregnancy. Published by Hamlyn, Octopus Publishing Group Ltd, London, UK.

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(2011) Human Development Report. This edition had the theme of Sustainability and Equity: A Better Future for All. Published on the United Nation's website at hdr.undp.org/.../HDR_2011_EN_Complete.pdf (accessed throughout 2013, Jan-Mar). UN Development Program: About the Human Development Index.
(2013) Human Development Report. This edition had the theme of The Rise of the South: Human Progress in a Diverse World. Published on the United Nation's HDR website at hdr.undp.org/.../hdr2013/ (accessed throughout 2013). UN Development Program: About the Human Development Index.
(2017) Human Development Report. Published by the UN Development Programme. Data for 2015. Analysis conducted by the UN Development Report Office. Available on hdr.undp.org/..

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(2014) Global Status Report on Alcohol and Health. A copy can be found on the WHO website. Accessed 2015 Jan 04. It "presents a comprehensive perspective on the global, regional and country consumption of alcohol, patterns of drinking, health consequences and policy responses in Member States" and was published in Geneva on 2014 May 12.

Footnotes

  1. "What is the Best Country in the World? An Index of Morality, Conscience and Good Life" by Vexen Crabtree (2017)^^^
  2. UN (2017) Table 1. Lower is better.^
  3. UN (2013) Table 9. Higher is better. Table 9. The UN's data is the latest available from a range of data from 2007-2011.^
  4. Pessi (2011) p947.^
  5. UN (2011) Table 6. Higher is better.^
  6. UN (2017) Dashboard 2. Higher is better - positive numbers represent growth, negative means reduction.^
  7. worldwildlife.org/threats/deforestation (not dated). Accessed 2017 Apr 25.^
  8. Reuters news agency (2014 Feb 25).^
  9. ^
  10. The Guardian (2007 May 30) article "Norway rated world's most peaceful country".^
  11. Charities Aid Foundation . Average ranking across years 2013-2016. Lower is better.^
  12. Gallup (2009) .^
  13. Zuckerman, P. (2007). Atheism: contemporary numbers and patterns. In M.Martin (Ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Atheism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. In "Average intelligence predicts atheism rates across 137 nations" by Lynn et al. (2009).^
  14. "Eurobarometer 225: Social values, Science & Technology". Published by Eurostat (2005) for the European Commission. Accessed 2008 Sep 01.^
  15. National Secular Society newsletter (2007 Mar 02), which included commentary on a Eurostat (2007) publication.^
  16. Wenzel (2011) p185.^
  17. UN (2017) Table 5. Lower is better.^^
  18. WHO (2014) Appendix 1. Alcohol Per Capita Consumption in liters of pure alcohol, 15+ years age population, consumed in 2010. Lower is better.^
  19. Peters (2011) chapter "Healthy Living" p28-32 .^
  20. Thorn (2003) p20-21.^
  21. WHO (2014) chapter 1 section 1.6.^
  22. WHO (2014) chapter 1 .^
  23. WHO (2014) chapter 3 .^
  24. World Health Organisation data for 2011-2015 from 7 data series accessed 2017 May 21. Details in "Immunizations: International Statistics on Vaccines and the Autism Scare: 3. World Health Organisation Statistics" by Vexen Crabtree (2017).^
  25. "Immunizations: International Statistics on Vaccines and the Autism Scare" by Vexen Crabtree (2017)^
  26. Skeptical Inquirer (2007 Nov/Dec) article "The Anti-Vaccination Movement" p25-31 by S. Novella, Dr. S. Novella is assistant professor of neurology at Yale University School of Medicine.^
  27. PHE (2017) section 1.^
  28. Goldacre (2008) chapter 16 "The Media's MMR Hoax" digital location 4528-4533.^
  29. Goldacre (2008) chapter 16 "The Media's MMR Hoax" digital location 4540.^
  30. Carroll (2011) p137-139.^
  31. UN (2013) Table 14. Births per woman (2012), expressed as deviance (positive or negative) from the value of 2.0.^
  32. UN (2017) Table 1. Higher is better.^
  33. Giddens (1997) p130.^
  34. Annual Cigarette Consumption Per Adult (age 15 and above) - compustible cigarettes. Euromonitor International (2014), via tobaccoatlas.org/topic/cigarette-use-globally/ . Accessed 2017 Jun 20.^
  35. ADL (2014) . Lower is better.^
  36. Hinnells (1997) entry "anti-semitism" .^
  37. Heywood (2003) p233.^
  38. Russell (1946) p324.^
  39. McCall (1979) p259-260.^
  40. ADL (2014) .^
  41. Kressel (2007) chapter 2 "Militant Islam: The Present Danger" digital location 868-871.^
  42. Harris (2006) p93.^
  43. Harris (2006) p114-115.^
  44. Bawer (2006) p140-148. The EUMC report (published 2004) is entitled "Manifestations of Anti-Semitism in the European Union".^
  45. Donnelly (2013) p278.^
  46. The Economist (2012 Mar 03) article "Homophobia: It's getting better" .^
  47. Higher is better. Sources:^
  48. Max possible=24. Total amount of treaties ratified. Nominal Commitment to Human Rights report published by UCL School of Public Policy, London, UK, at ucl.ac.uk/spp/research/research-projects/nchr accessed 2011 Apr 30.^
  49. Fraser Institute, the (2016) . Covers data for 2014.^
  50. www.globalslaveryindex.org published by The Walk Free Foundation, statistics published 2013 Oct. Accessed 2013 Oct 18.^
  51. www.globalslaveryindex.org About the Index page (n.d.) accessed 2013 Oct 18.^
  52. "What is the Best Country in the World? An Index of Morality, Conscience and Good Life: 3.6. Women Stand for Election & Vote (1893+) New Zealand, Australia, Finland" by Vexen Crabtree (2017)^
  53. Reporters Without Borders Report "2013 World Press Freedom Index: Dashed hopes after spring" at fr.rsf.org/.../classement_2013_gb-bd.pdf accessed 2013 Feb.^
  54. Freedom House publication "Freedom on the Net 2012" at www.freedomhouse.org/.../FOTN%202012%20-%20Tables%20and%20Charts%20FINAL.pdf accessed 2013 Feb 05.^
  55. internetlivestats.com/internet-users-by-country accessed 2017 Mar 10.^
  56. % of internet access via native IPv6 compared to IPv4. As of 2017 Jun 20, from http://www.cidr-report.org. Accessed 2017 Jun 20.^
  57. "What is the Best Country in the World? An Index of Morality, Conscience and Good Life: 4.4. Malware and Email Spam (2010-2) " by Vexen Crabtree (2017)^
  58. 2017 Jun 22: Added IPv6 uptake and smoking rates statistics.^
  59. 2017 Apr 25: Added UN HDR 2016 statistics on deforestation. And added 2016 data for Internet Users, replacing 2010 data.^
  60. 2017 Mar 22: Added UN HDR 2016 statistics, charitability statistics from the CAF and alcohol consumption from the WHO.^

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